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clueless joe

Using Win XP after Microsoft drops support

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I just looked at how complicated the migration from XP to Win 7 or Win 8 is, and I would rather not be bothered. I feel pretty safe running XP now since Kaspersky AV is doing a great job protecting me from Virus. Microsoft makes it seem like after April, anyone still running XP is vulnerable. Call me skeptical, but I trust the opinion of Kaspersky and it's users more than I trust Microsoft. Should I bite the bullet and upgrade, (six computers) or am I safe with XP and no Microsoft support?

Thanks for your input and advice.

 

Clueless Joe

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I just looked at how complicated the migration from XP to Win 7 or Win 8 is, and I would rather not be bothered. I feel pretty safe running XP now since Kaspersky AV is doing a great job protecting me from Virus. Microsoft makes it seem like after April, anyone still running XP is vulnerable. Call me skeptical, but I trust the opinion of Kaspersky and it's users more than I trust Microsoft. Should I bite the bullet and upgrade, (six computers) or am I safe with XP and no Microsoft support?

Thanks for your input and advice.

 

Clueless Joe

Hello, here is my input and advice. It isn't just scaremongering on MS part. You really should strongly consider upgrading. My personal preference is still W7 and I believe you would find that less hassle.

 

The process isn't that complicated and there are numerous well documented and illustrated guides on the internet free of charge to ease you through it and help avoid any catastrophies. I found XP or Vista drivers worked okay for hardware components that didn't have W7 drivers.

 

KAV/KIS can only do so much and can't prevent all operating system vulnerabilities and exploits being taken advantage of.

 

Also as far as I am aware, Kaspersky product support for windows XP systems will be included in the 2015 product but after that may be withdrawn.

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In addition to what antikythera indicates in the post above this post,

 

Let us take a moment to recall the end of Windows 2000.

 

The blogosphere was flooded with users bemoaning the end of support for their beloved Win2K.

 

Eventually, after a somewhat lengthy period of time, the flood of bemoaning tapered down to a steady flow, and then down to a trickle, and then to nothing.

 

The time to move to the next Windows operating system is sometime between when the next operating system is released, to when support for the operating system that is in use is discontinued.

 

Vista was released seven years ago. XP is dead in a few weeks. That equates to an approximately seven year period to make the move from XP to another operating system.

 

Sometime between the end of year 2006, to April 2014. Not before December 2006, and not after April, 2014.

 

 

Next, let us take a look at the situation.

 

Kaspersky is designed to provide protection for operating systems that are up to date.

 

Installing your favorite security software on un-updated Windows is like going to sleep in a house in a bad neighborhood and leaving the front door open and the windows open and the back door open, and then putting a gun under your pillow.

 

Please secure the back door and the Windows first, then put a gun under your pillow.

 

If the back door and the window can not be secured, due to any reason, you are sleeping in a house in a bad neighborhood, with the back door open, and the window open.

 

You are going to tell me that that is ok, because you have a gun under your pillow?

 

 

 

Un-updated operating systems that are connected to the internet form a breeding ground for all sorts of yucky viruses/malware.

 

If you want to be part of the solution, instead of part of the problem, you will withdraw your system from the internet when it is no longer possible for it to receive security fixes.

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In addition to what antikythera indicates in the post above this post,

 

Let us take a moment to recall the end of Windows 2000.

 

The blogosphere was flooded with users bemoaning the end of support for their beloved Win2K.

 

Eventually, after a somewhat lengthy period of time, the flood of bemoaning tapered down to a steady flow, and then down to a trickle, and then to nothing.

 

The time to move to the next Windows operating system is sometime between when the next operating system is released, to when support for the operating system that is in use is discontinued.

 

Vista was released seven years ago. XP is dead in a few weeks. That equates to an approximately seven year period to make the move from XP to another operating system.

 

Sometime between the end of year 2006, to April 2014. Not before December 2006, and not after April, 2014.

Next, let us take a look at the situation.

 

Kaspersky is designed to provide protection for operating systems that are up to date.

 

Installing your favorite security software on un-updated Windows is like going to sleep in a house in a bad neighborhood and leaving the front door open and the windows open and the back door open, and then putting a gun under your pillow.

 

Please secure the back door and the Windows first, then put a gun under your pillow.

 

If the back door and the window can not be secured, due to any reason, you are sleeping in a house in a bad neighborhood, with the back door open, and the window open.

 

You are going to tell me that that is ok, because you have a gun under your pillow?

Un-updated operating systems that are connected to the internet form a breeding ground for all sorts of yucky viruses/malware.

 

If you want to be part of the solution, instead of part of the problem, you will withdraw your system from the internet when it is no longer possible for it to receive security fixes.

I totally agree with richbuff and antikythera. Come April MS will not be providing any updates/fixes to XP. What this means is that malware/viruses can freely exploit any new vulnerabilities in XP, knowing that they will never be fixed by MS. Kaspersky cannot fix the vulnerability for you on MS behalf, so you would be horribly exposed. You may get lucky and not expose yourself to anything, but personally i would just not risk 1 computer let alone 6. Yes it is effort to upgrade, but it is time and effort well spent.

 

You will also find that vendors of 3rd party software will be dropping support for XP over the coming months, so that you could well find that your well loved software is not longer supported by those vendors because you are running on an unsupported operating system.

 

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I must concur with antikythera, richbuff, CMA and Rodion Nagornov on this. In fact, I got my final MS update this morning advising that XP support ends as of April 8, 2014. Tend to doubt there will be any further critical updates between now and then.

 

Believe me, I have sympathy for you given I've never had issues with XP (no BSODs) nor have I ever had to do a reinstall since the original install in 2006. In fact, I will continue to use XP off-line for certain older programs that can no longer be updated like my graphics proggie but I'm realistic enough to know it's time to move on. Therefore, after spending a good week researching the pros and cons of Wins 7 vs Wins 8 as well as the ability to function well with my default browser (Firefox), I chose to opt for Wins7 OEM version due to its good pricing ($138.99) and the fact MS will be providing mainstream support of Windows 7 until Jan. 13, 2015 with extended support (bug fixes and security updates) ending Jan. 14, 2020 according to their website.

 

Finally I took the plunge, installed Windows 7 and spent almost an entire day installing security updates and bug fixes. Then the real fun began as Windows 7 is set up very differently than XP and I spent a week researching and tweaking Windows 7 to get it just the way I wanted it. Was a great learning experience and I'm happy with the results.

 

Suggest you go to MS site for possible ramifications of continuing to use an unsupported OS such as XP: Microsoft

 

Also you need to determine if your current PC is capable of being updated to Windows 7 and if so, can it handle only the 32-bit version or does it have the ability to handle the 64-bit version. Go here to the Windows 7 Upgrade Adviser link to find out: Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor .

 

If your PC is new enough (built as of at least july of 2009), you hopefully will be able to update to Windows 7 and/or Windows 8. If, however, your PC is considerably older, you most likely will have to either buy and/or build a new PC. I took this into consideration when I built my new PC in September of 2009.

 

Finally. here are a couple links that can help with Windows 7 setup: Computer World Wins 7 Installation Help or Plan Your Windows 7 Clean Install

 

Good Luck!.

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Go for it, clueless joe.

 

I upgraded from XP and got a new computer, less that a month ago, specifying Windows 7 as I heard so many good things about it.

 

There's a lot that comes with the package and it has many improvements to the programmes that I use on a day to day basis.

 

It also gives you the opportunity to upgrade your Internet Explorer and I have found this to be an immense improvement.

 

I'm an old timer and don't always welcome change but I'm glad I did in this instance.

 

Take whatever advice you get from the guys on the forum. It's usually pretty good!

Edited by Toby Jugg

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With Microsoft no longer supporting Windows XP come I believe April 8th are there any suggestions/changes that need to be made from a Kaspersky standpoint to ensure computer security? I am currently running Anti-Virus 2014.

 

At a minimum should full scans be run more often?

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XP will not be maintained by MS, will Kaspersky maintain XP protection?

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