Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hello Folks,

 

Given the use of real-time scanning and background scans such as the rootkit scan, are the Critical Areas Scan and Full Scan needed after the initial scans are completed. I used to run the Critical Areas Scan after every update. I have changed that to running once daily. My full scan is set to run monthly. Is this a reasonable setup. No sense running something that isn't going to do much for me.

 

I know this has been asked before but I can't seem to find what I want running a search, so I appreciate the advice.

 

Thanks,

 

BC

Share this post


Link to post

Here is my regimen:

 

Full Scan upon first install then only scan as necessary once or twice every 3 months or so. As needed meaning if something peculiar is alerted to by Kaspersky.

 

I disable idle scan and leave auto rootkit scan at default. I almost never use the critical areas scan except maybe for testing.

 

The theory being if I start with a clean slate, Kaspersky real time protection will do its job. :)

 

Also, I don't use any other protection apps.

Share this post


Link to post
Here is my regimen:

 

Full Scan upon first install then only scan as necessary once or twice every 3 months or so. As needed meaning if something peculiar is alerted to by Kaspersky.

 

I disable idle scan and leave auto rootkit scan at default. I almost never use the critical areas scan except maybe for testing.

 

The theory being if I start with a clean slate, Kaspersky real time protection will do its job. :)

 

Also, I don't use any other protection apps.

 

 

Hi Rudger. Good to hear from you. Looks like we're in the same ballpark! I appreciate your input, and thanks for the quick reply!

 

BC

Share this post


Link to post

To add to rudgers' regimen:

 

I leave all Scan Settings at default. I never do an on-demand scan except for: After I clean install a new version or a new build, and if there is a reason for me to suspect malware issue. (for me, this can happen, because I assist other people with disinfections, and I collect quarantined(?) samples)

 

When I do decide to do the on-demand full scan, I max the full scan settings. When the scan is done, I revert to the strict defaults.

 

As rudger already mentioned, on-demand scan is not needed, because real-time protection (Web AV, File Anti-Virus, etc.) catch stuff way before any occasional on-demand scan will catch stuff.

 

The main reason that there is still an on-demand scan: The public expects it. But the publics' expectations are behind the times, in this department.

Share this post


Link to post
To add to rudgers' regimen:

 

I leave all Scan Settings at default. I never do an on-demand scan except for: After I clean install a new version or a new build, and if there is a reason for me to suspect malware issue. (for me, this can happen, because I assist other people with disinfections, and I collect quarantined(?) samples)

 

When I do decide to do the on-demand full scan, I max the full scan settings. When the scan is done, I revert to the strict defaults.

 

As rudger already mentioned, on-demand scan is not needed, because real-time protection (Web AV, File Anti-Virus, etc.) catch stuff way before any occasional on-demand scan will catch stuff.

 

The main reason that there is still an on-demand scan: The public expects it. But the publics' expectations are behind the times, in this department.

 

Thanks, Rich. This helps a lot too. It's good to know my brain is still functioning to some degree!! :b_lol1: :b_lol1:

Share this post


Link to post

Depends on personal setup, computer usage and paranoia (a little paranoia is healthy!).

 

I haven't done a full scan for a few years now (mainly because I know my security setup is relatively safe, my computer users know enough about security and don't go on shady websites or download software, I'm not worried about inactive files and have too many files on my old computer which will take too long to scan).

 

Other than real-time protection, where I have notched File-AV and Web-AV settings up a bit and set Application Filter to hyperactive mode, I just let Kaspersky's Rootkit scan run on it's own accord and run a Critical Area scan every month or two (with scan settings on Max).

Share this post


Link to post
Depends on personal setup, computer usage and paranoia (a little paranoia is healthy!).

 

I haven't done a full scan for a few years now (mainly because I know my security setup is relatively safe, my computer users know enough about security and don't go on shady websites or download software, I'm not worried about inactive files and have too many files on my old computer which will take too long to scan).

 

Other than real-time protection, where I have notched File-AV and Web-AV settings up a bit and set Application Filter to hyperactive mode, I just let Kaspersky's Rootkit scan run on it's own accord and run a Critical Area scan every month or two (with scan settings on Max).

 

Thanks, Dawgg - appreciate the insight.

Share this post


Link to post

I also haven't run a full scan and I disabled idle scan on my XP/MCE/SP3. I'm running on the original image from this 2004 machine which I guess is a pretty good record. The main reason I don't run full or idle is that the resource demand runs so high that it causes my high heat cpu fan to kick in. When I had SpyBot it did the same thing. Then there's that "paranoia" that some critter (malware) is fighting real hard to hide from Eugene (Kaspersky lol) and causing the cpu to run high. I am thinking of running a full but if I do I will boot in to Safe Mode thus reducing resourses. I agree with dawgg on the paranoia statement. It helps to avoid malicious critters.

Edited by ENIAC 2

Share this post


Link to post

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to make your experience of our websites better. By using and further navigating this website you accept this. Detailed information about the use of cookies on this website is available by clicking on more information.